This is how my dryer balls are made…

A lot of people have brought it to my attention that my dryer balls are ‘too bouncy’ to be 100% wool. If you were to say this to me in person, I’d invite you to cut one in half and see for yourself. I would also consider it to be a waste of the hard work I put into my dryer balls. The halved ball, on the other hand, I would be able to recycle into new dryer balls.

I don’t like to share anything about my process or the processes my art or craft goes through to get from point a to point b. This time, I will share my process. I find that it’s necessary for a dryer ball to have some bounce in it to bounce its way around the clothes dryer. It’s this bouncing action that is what actually softens the clothes as they’re being propelled around the inside of the clothes dryer.

The washed wool

I start out with about a 1/2 ounce of washed wool. I prefer to work with loose, washed wool because it’s easier to compress by hand than a carded batt of wool.

My beautiful picture My beautiful picture

I compress or squeeze the wool tightly in my hand until it’s firm enough to start a binding yarn. The binding yarn will aid in holding the wool together as you wrap the yarn around it while squeezing the ball tighter.

My beautiful picture My beautiful picture

I keep adding more wool until the ball is almost 2.25 inches in diameter. I begin by pushing the needle felting tool into the wool ball and keep doing this while I rotate the ball around and around.  I continue to needle felt it into a nice, firm, round ball until it meets my expectations for bounce and…..

My beautiful picture My beautiful picture

VOILA!! A dryer ball ready to be dressed up (covered with dyed wool, silk and/or decorative wool)!

My beautiful picture

I’ve not bought any dryer sheets or fabric softeners for the past 4 years. Considering that I used to go through a box of 120 count dryer sheets every 3 months, I’d say that I’ve saved roughly $55 over the past 4 years and that’s not bad for a really small family.

(On a side note: dryer balls are strictly fabric softeners. They do nothing to remove static electricity. Only a dehumidifier can do that properly, unless you live where there is high humidity.)

Save some money and buy a set of dryer balls for your dryer today at my Etsy shop!!

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3 thoughts on “This is how my dryer balls are made…

  1. Hi, Common Sense Homesteading shared your technique and i had to come check it out. Wow so different then the original tut I used to make my drier balls. I commented to her page “Too bouncy? Mine I did myself off another tut. and mine are just wound up 100% wool and they bounce pretty insane when falling out of the drier on occasion. Of course my cats love this huge toy LOL This tut looks like it makes smaller ones maybe I’ll have to try them Thanks for sharing.”
    Now your technique is def. little tricky for a noob like me but I might need to give this a try. I bet these would actually make me notice the anti static action. my current ones don’t. My cats my love you too 🙂

    Thanks for sharing and even tradition ones should bounce, people are just silly sometimes 🙂

    • These are 2.25 inches in diameter when they’re finished. I learned that surface area has nothing to do with softness. It’s all about the bounciness of the balls. Unfortunately, these do not prevent static electricity (I don’t think there is anything that really does without using a lot of chemical coatings and such.), but they do soften the clothes and reduce the drying time involved.
      I just updated this blog post with the following side note: (On a side note: dryer balls are strictly fabric softeners. They do nothing to remove static electricity. Only a dehumidifier can do that properly, unless you live where there is high humidity.)

  2. Pingback: Follow-up video about how I make my dryer balls! | frozentundrafiberarts

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